Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend International Conference and Exhibition on Materials Chemistry Valencia, Spain.

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Michael W. Tausch

University of Wuppertal, Germany

Keynote: Photocatalytic Redoxreactions

Time : 09:30-09:55

OMICS International Materials Chemistry 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Michael W. Tausch photo
Biography:

Michael W Tausch studied chemistry at the Polytechnic Institute of Bucharest, Romania, from 1967 to 1972. He subsequently studied mathematics and educational sciences in Bremen and Oldenburg, both Germany, and received his PhD from the University of Bremen in 1981. He was a teacher for chemistry and mathematics from 1976–1996. In 1996, he completed his habilitation at the University of Duisburg-Essen, Germany and became Professor for Chemistry and Chemical Education there. In 2005, he moved to the Department for Chemistry Didactics at Bergische Universität Wuppertal, Germany. He has published more than 222 papers and textbooks.

To present & exhibit your MATERIALS @ our upcoming series PS: Materials Conferences | Materials Chemistry Conferences | Materials Chemistry 2020

Abstract:

For investigating successfully, the mechanisms and techniques of light conversion into other energies, including energy storage in high energetic chemical compounds; we have to learn from nature. Doing so, we realize that effective biological systems like those in green leaves and in human eyes are in fact photoactive nano machines. That’s, why I say “Photo & Nano is a successful couple in using solar radiation on this planet”. So we have to search for artificial nano systems able to do act as photocatalysts. A model experiment called Photo-Blue-Bottle PBB simulating the natural cycle of photosynthesis and respiration has been developed and will be presented in this talk. It is practicable in homogeneous as well as in heterogeneous systems. There are following similarities between the reaction cycles in the PBB experiment and the natural cycles of photosynthesis and respiration: i) The carbon cycle in natural photosynthesis and respiration is similar to the substrate (ethylviologene) cycle in the PBB experiment, ii) the photocatalyst (proflavine or titanium dioxide) in the experiment works in principle similar like chlorophylls and other pigments in green leaves, iii) the photocatalytic active species must absorb the available light, i.v.) all reactions occur in aqueous solution, v) the oxidizing agent is oxygen from air in both cases, vi) the reduction needs light as driving force and vii) in the PBB experiment as well as in the natural photosynthesis light is converted into chemical energy and stored in the reduced substrate. The different versions of the PBB experiment suitable for investigating i) – vii) will be carried out at this conference in the workshop “Conversion of Light into Chemical Energy”.

Keynote Forum

Jas Pal Badyal

Durham University, UK

Keynote: Scalable functional nanocoatings

Time : 09:55-10:20

OMICS International Materials Chemistry 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Jas Pal Badyal photo
Biography:

Jas Pal Badyal was awarded BA/MA (1985) and PhD (1988) degrees from Cambridge University; where he subsequently held a King’s College Fellowship and the Oppenheimer Fellowship. He has been recipient of many honours relating to his work on Functional Surfaces, including the Harrison Prize from The Royal Society of Chemistry; the Burch Prize from The British Vacuum Council; and the IAAM Medal (International Association of Advanced Materials). His research has led to 3 successful start-up companies: Surface Innovations Ltd.; Dow Corning Plasma Ltd.; and P2i Ltd. (2015 International Business Award for 'Most Innovative Company in Europe').

To present & exhibit your MATERIALS @ our upcoming series PS: Materials Conferences | Materials Chemistry Conferences | Materials Chemistry 2020

Abstract:

The worldwide market for functional surfaces exceeds $50 billion per annum (US Department of Energy). A key driver is the added value that can be imparted to commercial products by the molecular engineering of their surface properties. For example, the cleanliness of optical lenses, the feel of fabrics, the resistance of biomedical devices to bacteria, the speed of computer hard disks, and even the wear of car brake pads are all governed by their surface properties. The fabrication of such surfaces requires the incorporation of specific functional groups; for which there exists no shortage of potential methods including: self-assembled monolayers (SAMs), Langmuir-Blodgett films, dip-coating, grafting, chemical vapour deposition, to name just a few. However such techniques suffer from drawbacks including substrate-specificity (cannot be easily adapted to different materials or geometries) and environmental concerns associated with the utilization of solvents, strong acid/base media, or heat. Plasma surface functionalization is a promising alternative which offers a wide range of benefits including low energy consumption, absence of solvents, minimal waste, rapid treatment times, scalability, and ambient processing temperatures. The molecular tailoring of solid surfaces will be described including super-repellency, non-fouling, thermoresponsive, rewritable, opto-chiral, antibacterial, capture and release, and nano-actuation. The application of this research has led to 37 patent families and the establishment of 3 successful start-up companies (Surface Innovations Ltd, Dow Corning Plasma Ltd, and P2i Ltd).